Monday, January 24, 2005

New owners not to come for a long time

Jayson Stark is reporting that the Nationals won't have new owners until at least July. This should give Jim Bowden just enough time to unload Brad Wilkerson and Jose Vidro at the trading deadline in exchange for Albert Belle, two players to be named later, and a stack of low-fat American cheese and a quarter pound of Havarti with Dill.

8 Comments:

At 3:22 PM, Blogger SuperNoVa said...

Mmmmmm. Havarti with Dill. But the question is, how much Havarti? I mean, if it's going to be a block of Havarti not seen in Washington since the Andrew Jackson administration, you'd have to consider it, wouldn't you?

 
At 3:29 PM, Blogger dexys_midnight said...

Now, see folks...THAT's the kind of link that will keep people coming back to this site. Fabulous.

p.s. Word has it that Wade Boggs once ate the same amount of cheese (1400 lbs) on a cross-country flight just for the heck of it.

 
At 4:08 PM, Blogger SuperNoVa said...

You know what's bizarre? It's the fact that I can specifically remember that picture being included in a book on the Presidents that my grandparents kept in their house on the East Side of Chicago [aside, most people think the East Side is Lake Michigan... but you'd be wrong]. It was pretty much the only readable book they had - I must have read it 1000 times (I actually inherited the thing - it was written during the Carter administration, which you can tell by the "James Earl Carter, 1977-" designation. I remembered the wheel of cheese incident as occurring during the Jackson inauguration - enough to Google "Andrew Jackson inauguration wheel of cheese" and boom, there it was. Isn't the Internet great?

Other fun facts I remember from that book - President James Garfield was ambidextrous and was fluent in Latin and Greek. He would entertain people by simultaneously writing in Greek and Latin with both hands. Must have been a ball at parties. James Madison was described as a "withered little Apple-John". . .oh the fun.

It's funny how I remember the smallest detail from a book I read twenty years ago...but often cannot remember if I've washed my hair when I'm ready to get out of the shower.

 
At 4:15 PM, Blogger DM said...

Regarding remembrance of small details, read the intro to "The Glory of Their Times" about the precise detail many of the ballplayers had in mind about the games they played 60 years earlier. It is said that we remember things more clearly in periods of intense stress/competition, especially when younger. Not sure what this says about your visits to the grandparents in East Chicago.

 
At 4:30 PM, Blogger dexys_midnight said...

Interesting. I wonder how that can possibly coincide, however, with all the studies that show how unreliable witnesses are. One would think that witnessing or having an accident/crime happen to you would be a stressful event, so how is it that witnesses are so remarkably unreliable?

 
At 4:38 PM, Blogger DM said...

I think it is the diferrence between being a witness to an and a participant in an event. For example, those watching early Americans eat a 1400-pound block of cheese might be so shocked by the sight they might lose track of details. However, those actually eating the cheese would be so jacked about the activity that their minds would be in a heightened state of awareness, at least until their arteries clog up and blood flow ceases to the brain.

 
At 5:06 PM, Blogger dexys_midnight said...

Ok, I understand now. So in the cheese example....

Participant: Then I took the knife, which was triangular with a green handle, and I slipped it into the cheese on a 36 degree angle, being careful to choose a spot where the cut of cheese wouldn't be too big for the cracker. I remember the cheese being particularly soft on the inside, even though the most-outer layer was somewhat hardened from the air. I placed the cheese on top of the cracker and moved toward the fruit plate so that others might have a snack themselves.

Witness: And then this freakin' 80-foot tall cheese monster came out of nowhere, knocking Martin Van Buren right out of the air. I remember it like it was yesterday. The smell of Swiss everywhere--and they said they were neutral! People were getting out crossbows left and right, arrows flying through the air, fire on their ends, melted cheese dropping, tons at a time, onto state-sized pitas. Old Hickory took out the left arm by himself. I tell you, if I hadn't seen it with my own eyes, I never would have believed it.

 
At 10:53 PM, Blogger tmk67 said...

"the smell of Swiss everywhere"...

THAT'S the type of observation that'll keep me coming back! (that and the reference to the Van Buren Boys...shall we all flash "8" to one another now?)

 

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